Fabric of Sound


When I first heard abc100’s Exit Site (Headphonica), I called it “the perfect experimental electronic pop album.” Almost a month and several listens later , I’ll stand by that statement. Exit Site isn’t like most of the albums you’ll find reviewied here at this blog. This album is more song-like with the 13 tracks running around the 1 to 2 minute mark. Some of them are filled with beats, but even with “standard” beats, the editing of the tracks with not-overdone sound effects and other process sounds give Exit Site a feel of the avant-garde or experimental.

Alexandr Sinyagin aka abc100 has written that he is bringing literature into music. About 18 months ago, Sinyagin released Cosmic Dance of Tanzania on Webbed Hand. For the Webbed Hand release and the latest release on Headphonica, Sinyagin writes that he is using the ideas of literature to help build “a fabric of sound”. These collaged pieces are put together very much like a sliding tile puzzle, though the journey to move the pieces and their correct placement, if any, is only known to Sinyagin.

      Bell Broc

A Protean Path

Jared C. Balogh just had a slew of music released and good for us! With Detaching Realities Vol. 2 on Headphonica, Rhythm of Life on Happy Puppy Records, and Drifting Soul on 45 Echoes Sound, we are blessed with hours of interestingly good music. I’ve been listening to Balogh’s jazz releases consistently over the last week while trying to write a review about them, however in the review I wanted to stay away from any comparison to Frank Zappa, but as you can deftly see that turned out to be impossible. Take a listen to the following track from Rhythm of Life:

      The Same Old Traps and Schemes

The two reasons I didn’t want to bring up Zappa in writing these reviews is that listeners how like Zappa might attribute too much importance on this comparison and not download the albums or listeners who do not like Zappa — there may be some —   might not download these albums. Regardless of your feelings towards Zappa, these are must have albums for your iPod.

Balogh creates a sonic world that is ever changing and pleasing to the ear even in it’s odd syncopation and nuances.  According to notes supplied by Balogh, these works are highly personal in their genesis. Whether or not this is the reason for such fine work, I don’t know. But these three albums start 2012 with some wonderful music.

      An Out of Tune Toon

Tom Hanks Wears Fucanelli’s Shoes

Ergo Phizmiz - Fulcanelli's Shoes

Yesterday morning the netlabel Headphonica released their second work by Ergo Phizmiz, Fulcanelli’s Shoes, a film and music work that is [            ]. If you are unfamiliar with Phizmiz and his work, think cultual absurdist, think of a kid made entirely of Crayons hiding in a cardboard box and, at the same time, standing outside of it playing a triangle. Forget the media’s appetite and laziness to compare Phizmiz to other cultural-icons, Phizmiz is only himself. Fulcanelli’s Shoes should be experienced by readers of this blog, if only because it’s better than Dancing With The Stars. After a very short email chain with no one related to this work, I fabricated this quote from Phizmiz that in no way sums up what Fulcanelli’s Shoes is about:

During the 1930s whose still unknown time extremely hermetic symbolism risen from pre-history including the identity of in motion a train that I warn that he was Fulcanelli marking the double catastrophe.

Along with this work, Heaphonica released a companion piece, Music From The Shoes of Fulcanelli, which oddly enough is self-explanatory.

Ergo Phizmiz - Barbette     

A Little Bit Rock’n Roll

Björn & Gorden - Electrr

As Dylan from Beat Lizzard tweeted the other day, sometimes the music just doesn’t excite you. I knew exactly what he meant. I, too, needed something to zap my neurons. So for the last few days, I’ve been trying to get out of my comfort zone as evidenced by my reviews of Cagey House’s June through the Window and bubbles’ Asleep. And as regular readers may know, I really don’t review “rock” music at this blog, but my need for a caffeine jolt to my musical senses was pushing me along. Björn & Gorden’s Electrr (Headphonica) is one of those albums that is helping to shake me loose. The liner notes describe Electrr as “electronic rock music”, yeah, I don’t know what that means but the album’s got a wonderful feel to it. It reminds me of hanging out with my buddy’s band as they just jammed, feeling the groove and moving through it. Electrr is a delight to listen to and, most of all, wonderful help for me to navigate my way out of my musical doldrums.